Valley banks jointly announce Coronavirus actions


SAN LUIS VALLEY– A number of San Luis Valley banks have decided to temporarily close their lobbies, but they are still open to serve their customers.
To further attempts to slow the spread of COVID-19, Alamosa State Bank, Del Norte Bank, First Southwest Bank, Rio Grande Savings and Loan Association and San Luis Valley Federal Bank all have temporarily closed their lobbies. Each bank will continue to serve customers through their drive-up facilities, walk-up facilities, night drops, ATMs and their electronic banking services.
Appointments are available for loan requests and new accounts.
“Providing ongoing and consistent banking services is our primary mission and each of our banks will remain open to ensure our communities navigate this difficult situation,” said Mike Hurst, president and CEO of Del Norte Bank.
 “Closing our lobbies is not an easy decision. However, data show that closing the lobbies will mean less exposure to the virus and therefore it will help keep our employees, our customers and our community safe. Things will return to normal, and we will keep our communities up to date as events evolve,” said Duane Bussey, CEO of San Luis Valley Federal Bank.
“Each of our banks is also ready to provide short-term loans or loan extensions to offer additional support to our community, said Russell Achatz, president and CEO at Alamosa State Bank. Our loan officers can take credit requests by telephone or make other arrangements to meet with people individually.”
Alamosa State Bank, Del Norte Bank, First Southwest Bank, Rio Grande Savings and Loan Association and San Luis Valley Federal Bank are all community banks based in the Valley.
Shon Davis, president and CEO of Rio Grande Savings and Loan said, “all of our banks are well capitalized and strong financially and we of course provide the safety of FDIC insurance for our deposit accounts.”
“As community banks, we have to put the needs of the community first and that means preventing the spread of Coronavirus as much as possible” said Kent Curtis, CEO of First Southwest Bank.

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